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Yesterday, Bob Davis, Senior Product Manager at Red Hat announced that Clang/LLVM, Go, and Rust will now enter “Full Support Phase”. The support lifecycle is changed after the General Availability (GA) of Clang/LLVM 6.0, Go 1.10, and Rust 1.29.

Previously, these languages and tools were in “Technology Preview” status. They were provided for users to test their functionality and provide feedback. This was during the development process and there was no full supported under the Red Hat Subscription Level Agreements. They were not guaranteed to be functionally complete and were not intended for live production use.

GA means that these products have now officially entered a phase to receive full support. Their website states that: “During the Full Support Phase, qualified Critical and Important Security errata advisories (RHSAs) and Urgent and Selected High Priority Bug Fix errata advisories (RHBAs) may be released as they become available. Other errata advisories may be delivered as appropriate.

On availability, support for new hardware and some enhanced software functionality may also be provided at the sole discretion of Red Hat. These are generally in minor releases. The minor releases will focus only on resolving defects/bugs. New installation images of the minor releases will be provided during this full support phase.


As these packages are evolving fast, the support lifecycle will also have short intervals. This means that there will be quarterly updates to Rust, and updates every 6 months to LLVM and Golang.

The support for them will be different than the usual long-term support LTS approach.

For LLVM, Rust, and Go only the most recent build will be maintained. If an older version has a bug, the most recent build will be updated to fix it. If a bug is present in the current build, it will be addressed in the next scheduled build. That will be the next schedules minor release.

For more details, visit the Red Hat Blog.

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