2 min read

The .NET team has announced that have completely moved the .NET Core platform to RyuJIT, the compiler written in-house by Microsoft. The team had been long working on this shift to make the compilation faster for .NET Core applications given that web applications today take time to start up.

JIT compiler is a program that converts the instructions written in .NET Core to native machine code so that it can be sent to the processor for processing action. The JIT compilers have become a standard to support the compilation for various platforms. They are an improvement over the traditional compilers which require the programs to re-compile when using on different computer systems.

RyuJIT is developed by the .NET Core team as the next generation 64-bit compiler that will compile programs twice as fast. The .NET Core compiled with this JIT compiler is recorded to have 30% improved faster start-up time. Also the apps compiled with the RvyJIT produce great code that run efficiently on the servers. The most important factor that helped the performance was basing the RyuJIT to x64, shifting from x86 codebase.

One of the major stability factors this will bring is that .NET programs will perform consistently across various architectures and will provide compatibility for .NET programs across the platforms like ARM, mobile, among others. This will help developers maintain a codebase that compiles on both 64-bit and 32-bit compilers and perform on both types of systems.

The .NET team has promised the stability of the platform after this move and are expecting the performance to improve. The team is inviting developers to join the community and has put the documentation for the RyuJIT on the GitHub repository.

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