JBI Binding Components in NetBeans IDE 6

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Binding Components

Service Engines are pluggable components which connect to the Normalized Message Router (NMR) to perform business logic for clients. Binding components are also standard JSR 208 components that plug in to NMR and provide transport independence to NMR and Service Engines. The role of binding components is to isolate communication protocols from JBI container so that Service Engines are completely decoupled from the communication infrastructure. For example, BPEL Service Engine can receive requests to initiate BPEL process while reading files on the local file system. It can receive these requests from SOAP messages, from a JMS message, or from any of the other binding components installed into JBI container.

Binding Component is a JSR 208 component that provides protocol independent transport services to other JBI components.

The following figure shows how binding components fit into the JBI Container architecture:

JBI Binding Components in NetBeans IDE 6

In this figure, we can see that the role of BC is to send and receive messages both internally and externally from Normalized Message Router using protocols, specific to the binding component. We can also see that any number of binding components can be installed into the JBI container. This figure shows that like Service Engines (SE), binding components do not communicate directly with other binding components or with Service Engines. All communication between individual binding components and between binding components and Service Engines is performed via sending standard messages through the Normalized Message Router.

NetBeans Support for Binding Components

The following table lists which binding components are installed into the JBI container with NetBeans 5.5 and NetBeans 6.0:

 

As is the case with Service Engines, binding components can be managed within the NetBeans IDE. The list of Binding Components installed into the JBI container can be displayed by expanding the Servers | Sun Java System Application Server 9 | JBI | Binding Components node within the Services explorer.

JBI Binding Components in NetBeans IDE 6

The lifecycle of binding components can be managed by right-clicking on a binding component and selecting a lifecycle process—Start, Stop, Shutdown, or Uninstall.

JBI Binding Components in NetBeans IDE 6

The properties of an individual binding component can also be obtained by selecting the Properties menu option from the context menu as shown in the following figure.

JBI Binding Components in NetBeans IDE 6

Now that we’ve discussed what binding components are, and how they communicate both internally and externally to the Normalized Message Router, let’s take a closer look at some of the more common binding components and how they are accessed and managed from within the NetBeans IDE.

File Binding Component

The file binding component provides a communications mechanism for JBI components to interact with the file system. It can act as both a Provider by checking for new files to process, or as a Consumer by outputting files for other processes or components.

JBI Binding Components in NetBeans IDE 6

The figure above shows the file binding component acting as a Provider of messages. In this scenario, a message has been sent to the JBI container, and picked up by a protocol-specific binding component (for example, a SOAP message has been received). A JBI Process then occurs within the JBI container which may include routing the message between many different binding components and Service Engines depending upon the process. Finally, after the JBI Process has completed, the results of the process are sent to File Binding Component which writes out the result to a file.

JBI Binding Components in NetBeans IDE 6

The figure above shows the file binding component acting as a Consumer of messages. In this situation, the File Binding Component is periodically polling the file system looking for files with a specified filename pattern in a specified directory. When the binding component finds a file that matches its criteria, it reads in the file and starts the JBI Process, which may again cause the input message to be routed between many different binding components and Service Engines. Finally, in this example, the results of the JBI Process are output via a Binding Component.

Of course, it is possible that a binding component can act as both a provider and a consumer within the same JBI process. In this case, the file binding component would be initially responsible for reading an input message from the file system. After any JBI processing has occurred, the file binding component would then write out the results of the process to a file.

Within the NetBeans Enterprise Pack, the entire set of properties for the file binding component can be edited within the Properties window. The properties for the binding component are displayed when either the input or output messages are selected from the WSDL in a composite application as shown in the following figure.

JBI Binding Components in NetBeans IDE 6

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